catapult magazine

catapult magazine
Truth

vol. 9, num. 19 :: 2010.10.22 — 2010.11.04

Throughout human history, we’ve expressed our ideas about truth with images that carry vastly different meanings. Think: hanging it on a flagpole or panning for gold or trying to catch a moonbeam in your hand. Do you meet the word with a swell of confidence or a shudder of unease? Or maybe both?

 

Feature

There is more than one version of this

A crime reporter's perspective on nothing but the truth.

Fact vs. truth

A childhood of gathering evidence gives way to an adulthood of storytelling.

Editorial

Living from mystery

On truth, interpretation and the search for a bible-based way of life.

Articles

The popular and the absolute

Wrestling with truth in the context of taste and interpretation.

Thumbnail image for article

Truth without borders

An interview with John Van Sloten, author of The Day Metallica Came to Church.

Thumbnail image for article

Choosing to surrender

A reflection on religious identity and the freedom of commitment.

Thumbnail image for article

Our shrinking souls

On Emerson's understanding of the soul and the search for divine truth.

Thumbnail image for article

The lie of perfection

On giving politicians permission to tell the truth.

Gallery

In case you missed it the first time

A waste of time?

I thought liberal arts classes would be boring, until I started finding God in every one of them.

Seeking truth

Who are the gatekeepers of God?s truth?

The gift of disillusionment

How and why college sophomores are learning to embrace apocalypse.

Weaving the web

Cornel West: Truth

Astra Taylor’s car-ride interview with the Princeton philosopher.

 

Nothing outside the text? Taking Derrida to church

James K.A. Smith on postmodern philosophy, interpretation and the Bible.

 
 

daily asterisk

Learning versus playing. That dichotomy seems natural to people…. Learning, according to that almost automatic view, is what children do in school and, maybe, in other adult-directed activities. Playing is, at best, a refreshing break from learning. From that view, summer vacation is just a long recess, perhaps longer than necessary. But here’s an alternative view, which should be obvious but apparently is not: playing is learning. At play, children learn the most important of life’s lessons, the ones that cannot be taught in school. To learn these lessons well, children need lots of play — lots and lots of it, without interference from adults.

Peter Gray
“The play deficit” in Aeon Magazine

Sign up on our free e-mail list to receive the daily asterisk by e-mail every weekday.

recent Blog Updates

the Back Page