catapult magazine

catapult magazine
Subversive Love

vol. 8, num. 4 :: 2009.02.13 — 2009.02.27

Don’t fall in love in a time of war. Don’t fall in love with someone of the same gender or a different race or another generation. Don’t love your kids too much. We internalize so many messages about love—romantic, platonic or otherwise—and yet it breaks through in astonishing ways, whether we invite it in or not.

 

Feature

A Love whose name cannot be spoken

An analysis of pop culture artifacts to expose myths about true love.

Editorial

Love in the time of softball

Creative jock or an athletic artist?  A reflection on a time of making decisions about love.

Articles

Thanks for love

On discovering that perfectly imperfect someone.

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Conversation: “Subversive Love”

Your opportunity to contribute thoughts about empire and subversion.

Reclaiming Mardi Gras

A Louisiana native provides a closer look at Mardi Gras, a traditional time of celebration before Lent.

Reviews

Embodying our grief

A review of the new book Fasting by
Scot McKnight.

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Gallery

In case you missed it the first time

Sock feathers

A child's approach to language can remind us to leave our pride behind when we seek the kingdom.

Love is a pile of rocks

What the journey to the Promised Land teaches us about God and memory.

Spiritual violence and hate crimes

How preserving heterosexual privilege in the name of Christ defies the Gospel.

Weaving the web

Rom-coms ‘spoil your love life’

Watching romantic comedies can spoil your love life, a study by a university in Edinburgh has claimed.

 

Prayers of a bird and boy

A bird, a boy and an impossible pause in an unconventional “summer fling” essay by Daniel Silliman.

 

Matchmakers

Four stories about attempts at making matches…of various sorts.

 
 

Columns

Me1

In defense of my generation

A response to the charges of relativism that get lobbed across philosophical dividing lines.

daily asterisk

My own experience has shown me that it is possible to live in and attentively study the same small place decade after decade, and find that it ceaselessly evades and exceeds comprehension. There is nothing that it can be reduced to, because “it” is always, and not predictably, changing. It is never the same two days running, and the better one pays attention the more aware one becomes of these differences. Living and working in the place day by day, one is continuously revising one’s knowledge of it, continuously being surprised by it and in error about it. And even if the place stayed the same, one would be getting older and growing in memory and experience, and would need for that reason alone to work from revision to revision. One knows one’s place, that is to say, only within limits, and the limits are in one’s mind, not in the place. This is a description of life in time in the world. A place, apart form our now always possible destruction of it, is inexhaustible. It cannot be altogether known, seen, understood, or appreciated.

Wendell Berry
Life is a Miracle


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