catapult magazine

catapult magazine
My Third Place

vol. 5, num. 9 :: 2006.05.05 — 2006.05.19

"Third place" is a term used to describe the places we gather with one another apart from work and home. This issue will take a look at the places where we renew ourselves and experience community.

 

Feature

Nuts and bolts and conversation

An interview with Dale Ter Haar, owner of South Park Hardware in South Holland, Illinois.

Editorial

Healing place: a sketch

A reflection on lives intersecting in unexpected spaces.

Articles

Church as "third place" as church

What is the relationship between church space and third place?

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Paths lead here

On how the Centennial Park Gazebo in Holland, Michigan, became engraved into a life story.

Thin place

A story of discovering the place of refreshment.

Reviews

Audio community

A review of Susan Enan's five-song EP.

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Gallery

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In case you missed it the first time

An e-mail address for the guy who took our photo at the place around the corner where we went for coffee

The merging of two cultures yields a lesson in experiencing community.

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Re-inventing the well

Even as big boxes multiply, "neighborhood values" are becoming an important part of the national conversation.

Denim sinner, coffeeshop Savior

How true love meets guilt and shame one fateful, folk-filled evening.

A cup half empty

A review of Coffee and Cigarettes directed by Jim Jarmusch.

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Weaving the web

More on Ray Oldenberg

A biography and information about the sociologist who coined the term "third place."

 

Third Place Commons

Explore the web site for this important public space in Lake Forest, Washington.

 
 

Columns

Default

A concert hall reclaimed

On live performance space as "third place."

daily asterisk

We have to acknowledge that the help that comes after the violence has been done, though it undeniably helps, is not a solution to violence. The solution, many times more complex and difficult, would be to go beyond our ideas, obviously insane, of war as the way to peace and of permanent damage to the ecosphere as the way to wealth. Actually to help our suffering of one man-made horror after another, we would have to revise radically our understanding of economic life, of community life, of work, and of pleasure. We employ thousands of scientists and spend billions of dollars to reduce matter to its smallest particles and to search for farther stars. How many scientists and how many dollars are devoted to harmony between economy and ecology, or to amity and lenity in the face of hatred and killing? To learn to meet our needs without continuous violence against one another and our only world would require an immense intellectual and practical effort, requiring the help of every human being perhaps to the end of human time. This would be work worthy of the name “human.” It would be fascinating and lovely.

Wendell Berry
“The Commerce of Violence” in Our Only World

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