catapult magazine

catapult magazine
In Kind

vol. 8, num. 20 :: 2009.10.16 — 2009.10.29

Every year in the U.S. and around the world, millions of people volunteer, adding up to billions of dollars’ worth of time. Service creates a form of exchange not based on monetary profit, but on other benefits for individuals and communities. So how do we choose where and when to volunteer?

 

Feature

Things I carry with me

A collection of thoughts gathered during time spent in Africa.

Editorial

Paid in hope and heartbreak

Why I volunteer -- and create opportunities for others to do the same.

Articles

Volunteering as a way of life

A recent graduate explores the benefits of full-time volunteering through Mennonite Voluntary Service.

For whose glory?

On learning to see God's love in action, not ours.

Conversation: “In Kind”

Your opportunity to contribute thoughts about volunteering -- why you love it, why you hate it.

Gallery

Thumbnail image for gallery

In case you missed it the first time

The cost of short-term missions

Americans spend millions of dollars each year on short-term mission trips to developing countries. Do these trips do more harm than good?

Gainful unemployment

A resigned nurse learns to be still and value a new kind of productivity.

Dreamers vs. Dreamingers

A freelance development worker reports on the state of Africa and his own sense of hope.

Thumbnail image for article

Weaving the web

Mennonite Voluntary Service

One of many opportunities to spend a year in service—check it out.

 

One family beating the recession by traveling the Americas

A creative glass-half-full idea in response to getting laid off.

 
 

daily asterisk

My own experience has shown me that it is possible to live in and attentively study the same small place decade after decade, and find that it ceaselessly evades and exceeds comprehension. There is nothing that it can be reduced to, because “it” is always, and not predictably, changing. It is never the same two days running, and the better one pays attention the more aware one becomes of these differences. Living and working in the place day by day, one is continuously revising one’s knowledge of it, continuously being surprised by it and in error about it. And even if the place stayed the same, one would be getting older and growing in memory and experience, and would need for that reason alone to work from revision to revision. One knows one’s place, that is to say, only within limits, and the limits are in one’s mind, not in the place. This is a description of life in time in the world. A place, apart form our now always possible destruction of it, is inexhaustible. It cannot be altogether known, seen, understood, or appreciated.

Wendell Berry
Life is a Miracle


Note: We’re back! We’re excited to announce that *culture is not optional, the publisher of the daily asterisk, is launching a new online magazine called Topology on September 28. For more, visit our Facebook page; we’ll have a new e-mail list ready to go soon, too. Thanks!

Sign up on our free e-mail list to receive the daily asterisk by e-mail every weekday.

recent Blog Updates

the Back Page

recent comments