catapult magazine

catapult magazine
In Kind

vol. 8, num. 20 :: 2009.10.16 — 2009.10.29

Every year in the U.S. and around the world, millions of people volunteer, adding up to billions of dollars’ worth of time. Service creates a form of exchange not based on monetary profit, but on other benefits for individuals and communities. So how do we choose where and when to volunteer?

 

Feature

Things I carry with me

A collection of thoughts gathered during time spent in Africa.

Editorial

Paid in hope and heartbreak

Why I volunteer -- and create opportunities for others to do the same.

Articles

Volunteering as a way of life

A recent graduate explores the benefits of full-time volunteering through Mennonite Voluntary Service.

For whose glory?

On learning to see God's love in action, not ours.

Conversation: “In Kind”

Your opportunity to contribute thoughts about volunteering -- why you love it, why you hate it.

Gallery

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In case you missed it the first time

The cost of short-term missions

Americans spend millions of dollars each year on short-term mission trips to developing countries. Do these trips do more harm than good?

Gainful unemployment

A resigned nurse learns to be still and value a new kind of productivity.

Dreamers vs. Dreamingers

A freelance development worker reports on the state of Africa and his own sense of hope.

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Weaving the web

Mennonite Voluntary Service

One of many opportunities to spend a year in service—check it out.

 

One family beating the recession by traveling the Americas

A creative glass-half-full idea in response to getting laid off.

 
 

daily asterisk

Learning versus playing. That dichotomy seems natural to people…. Learning, according to that almost automatic view, is what children do in school and, maybe, in other adult-directed activities. Playing is, at best, a refreshing break from learning. From that view, summer vacation is just a long recess, perhaps longer than necessary. But here’s an alternative view, which should be obvious but apparently is not: playing is learning. At play, children learn the most important of life’s lessons, the ones that cannot be taught in school. To learn these lessons well, children need lots of play — lots and lots of it, without interference from adults.

Peter Gray
“The play deficit” in Aeon Magazine

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