catapult magazine

catapult magazine
Charged Up

vol. 6, num. 9 :: 2007.05.04 — 2007.05.18

Planes and trains, people and places—various kinds of fuels feed their motion and existence.  The coal-fired power plant keeps the lights on in the corner coffee shop where pop music propels a student toward the concluding paragraph.  What principles guide our choices for what fuels our transportation and places?  Beyond energizing our physical bodies, what powers our minds and spirits?

 

Feature

(Hyper)tension and energy

A tension of thought reveals itself in physical symptoms.

Editorial

Friction makes fire

On the energy that results from tension within the self and within communities.

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Articles

Imaginative fancy and innocuous fantasy

A reflection on the energizing power, for better or worse, of imagination.

Stimulating imagination

On finding the energy to change the world through environmental practices.

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Quick waiting

A blessing for our passions to be energized by the long view.

Reviews

Get me through another day

A review of the film Pan’s Labyrinth exploring the film's imaginative qualities.

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Transforming Reznor

Is NIN’s Year Zero the beginning of the beginning?

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In case you missed it the first time

Energizing memories

Can the American church remember its purpose and reclaim its identity?

Peak oil "to do" list

Why we should do these things anyway.

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Weaving the web

Stairway to Heaven

Tim Flannery explodes the myth of the hydrogen economy.

 

Don’t stop unbelieving

Scott McLemee reviews a book about the bogey (wo)man of 20th century Christianity, Madalyn Murray O’Hair.

 

Readers write: Rebellion

Magazine readers write on that often-energizing force of rebellion.

 
 

daily asterisk

I also believe that Jefferson was right — that we cannot successfully fashion ourselves as a “public” until we replace that word within its “republican” context, and within the context of the way we inhabit very particular stretches of land. If in fact there is a connection between the places we inhabit and the political culture which our inhabiting of them produces, then perhaps it makes sense to begin with the place, with a sense of what it is, and then try to imagine a way of being public which would fit the place.

Daniel Kemmis
Community and the Politics of Place

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